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Pulse Corniche
Pulse Corniche
Relational Architecture 22, 2015
Pulse Corniche was an interactive canopy of powerful light beams projected into to the sky by robotic searchlights whose brightness and orientation was controlled by the heart-rate of visitors to the Abu Dhabi’s Corniche. People were free to participate by holding a sensor placed in the centre of the plaza that converted the electrical activity of their heart into a unique lighting sequence. The intensity and direction of the lights visualized the different biometric rhythms of each participant, in an urban scale. View Details.
Zero Noon
Zero Noon
2013
“Zero Noon” is a digital clock that shows the current time according to eccentric metrics: it uses hundreds of different internet-refreshed statistics. The clock's reference systems are all synchronized so that precisely at noon they all zero and start over. The public may change the statistics by manually scrolling through the list using small push-buttons under the built-in display. The metrics come from government data, Harper’s Magazine, financial institutions, NGOs, academic studies and other trusted sources. View Details.
Friendfracker
Friendfracker
2013
Friendfracker is a service that automatically deletes a set of friends from your Facebook account. Upon authenticating your data on the website, the service deletes 1 to 10 friends at random. The project was developed with Harper Reed for Rhizome's 7 on 7 conference. View Details.
Airborne Projection
Airborne Projection
Relational Architecture 20, 2013
“Airborne” was an interactive installation commissioned by the Chrysler Museum of Art to transform Norfolk’s public space into a poetic shadow play. Participants blocked the light of two projectors casting their shadows on a 900 sqm wall, and these were tracked by computerized surveillance systems. Out of the shadows emanated bellowing smoke which was mapped onto the wall and accumulated in it. Readable within the smoke were clouds of text, themselves turbulent, from salient poetic texts on light and shadow. View Details.
Tape Recorders
Tape Recorders
Subsculpture 14, 2011
Rows of motorised measuring tapes record the amount of time that visitors stay in the installation. As a computerised tracking system detects the presence of a person, the closest measuring tape starts to project upwards. When the tape reaches around 3 meters high it crashes and recoils back. Each hour, the system prints the total number of minutes spent by the sum of all visitors. View Details.
Voice Array
Voice Array
Subsculpture 13, 2011
As a participant speaks into an intercom, his or her voice is automatically translated into flashes of light and then the unique blinking pattern is stored as a loop in the first light of the array. Each new recording pushes all previous recordings one position down and gradually one can hear the cumulative sound of the 288 previous recordings. The voice that was pushed out of the array can then be heard by itself. View Details.
Nave Solar
Nave Solar
2011
Nave Solar is an interactive installation featuring a fake Sun that is activated by the pendular motion of the public as they hang from a rope and swing along the nave of a 16th Century catholic inquisition church. Using tracking systems, the installation detects the motion of participants and generates smoke that accumulates on the ceiling of the apse as well as activates the Sun's flares, surface turbulence and sun spots. View Details.
Articulated Intersect
Articulated Intersect
Relational Architecture 18, 2011
“Articulated Intersect” is a large-scale installation that produces an interactive canopy of light that can be modified by the public using six large lever-controllers that protrude from the ground. As a participant points one of these levers three powerful robotic searchlights automatically intersect in the sky to create an apex at that location. The participant may direct the apex anywhere over the city in real-time, creating an animated tetrahedron inspired by the work of Richard Buckminster Fuller. View Details.
Please Empty Your Pockets
Please Empty Your Pockets
Subsculpture 12, 2010
Please Empty your Pockets is an installation that consists of a conveyor belt with a scanner that records and accumulates everything that passes under it. The public may place any small object on the conveyor belt: once it passes under the scanner, the object reappears on the other side beside projected objects from the memory of the installation. As a real item is removed from the conveyor belt, it leaves behind a projected image of itself, which is then used to accompany future objects. The piece remembers up to 600,000 objects which are displayed beside new ones that are added to the installation. View Details.
Solar Equation
Solar Equation
Relational Architecture 16, 2010
"Solar Equation" is a large-scale public art installation that consists of a faithful simulation of the Sun, 100 million times smaller than the real thing. Commissioned by the Light in Winter Festival in Melbourne, the piece features the world’s largest spherical balloon, custom-manufactured for the project, which is tethered over Federation Square and animated using five projectors. The solar animation on the balloon is generated by live mathematical equations that simulate the turbulence, flares and sunspots that can be seen on the surface of the Sun. This produces a constantly changing display that never repeats itself, giving viewers a glimpse of the majestic phenomena that are observable at the solar surface and that only relatively recent advances in astronomy have discovered. Using an iPhone, iPod touch or iPad, people may disturb the animations in real-time and select different fluid dynamic visualizations. View Details.
Pulse Index
Pulse Index
2010
"Pulse Index" is an interactive installation that records participants’ fingerprints at the same time as their heart rates. The piece displays data for the last 765 and over participants in a stepped display that creates a horizon line of skin. As new recordings are added, the oldest ones disappear, —a kind of memento mori. To participate, people introduce their finger into a custom-made sensor equipped with a digital microscope and a heart rate sensor; their fingerprint immediately appears on the largest cell of the display, pulsating to their heart beat. View Details.
Cardinal Directions
Cardinal Directions
Subsculpture 11, 2010
"Cardinal Directions", 2010, is a kinetic sculpture which consists of a surveillance monitor that displays an extract of Vicente Huidobro´s poem “Altazor” (1919-1931). Refering to the geography of his native Chile, Huidobro wrote “The four cardinal directions are three: North and South”. When a presence is detected by infrared sensors, the monitor starts to rotate. As the poem is “geolocated” it always aligns itself to the cardinal points, and the public must walk around the piece in order to read it, like a kind of periscope. View Details.
The Company of Colours
The Company of Colours
Shadow Box 9, 2009
"The Company of Colours" is the ninth piece in the Shadow Box series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows the live camera view constructed out of a palette of named colour swatches that can be rendered by computers. Every few minutes the piece automatically switches to show the live view made with a variety of culturally-significant colour palettes from computer and videogame history, including the 4 shades of green of the original Nintendo Gameboy, the eight colours of teletext, and the sixteen colours of the Commodore 64, the Apple II and the ZX Spectrum. View Details.
Seismoscopes
Seismoscopes
2009
The series "Seismoscopes" consists of devices that detect vibration around them, from footsteps to earthquakes, and record this vibration on paper using an automated XY-plotter. As each Seismoscope registers any seismic wave it is programmed to draw an illustration of a single Skeptical philosopher, over and over again. View Details.
Voz Alta
Voz Alta
Relational Architecture 15, 2008
"Voz Alta" (Loud Voice) is a memorial commissioned for the 40th anniversary of the student massacre in Tlatelolco. Participants who speak into a megaphone automatically control the brightness of four searchlights that relay their voice over Mexico City as quiet light flashes; tuning into 96.1FM radio allows people anywhere in the city to listen in live to what the lights are saying. View Details.
Make Out
Make Out
Shadow Box 8 , 2008
"Make Out" is the eight piece in the Shadow Box series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows thousands of internet videos of couples looking at each other: as soon as someone stands in front of the display his or her silhouette is shown and all the couples within it begin to kiss. The massive array of make-out sessions continues for as long as someone is in front of the work, --as he or she moves away all the kissing ends. View Details.
Pulse Park
Pulse Park
Relational Architecture 14, 2008
"Pulse Park" is comprised of a matrix of light beams that graze the central oval field of Madison Square Park. Their intensity is entirely modulated by a sensor that measures the heart rate of participants and the resulting effect is the visualization of vital signs, arguably our most symbolic biometric, in an urban scale. View Details.
Alpha Blend
Alpha Blend
Shadow Box 7, 2008
"Alpha Blend" is the seventh piece in the Shadow Box series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows the viewer's presence revealing and blending pictures of people who have recently looked at the work. A game of "reverse puppetry" ensues, where a portrait from the past is animated by a live presence, in a similar preceptual mechanism than the one used in Lozano-Hemmer's public art installation "Body Movies". View Details.
Pulse Spiral
Pulse Spiral
2008
"Pulse Spiral" is a three-dimensional spiral paraboloid made up of 400 lightbulbs arranged according to Fermat's equations, which records and responds to the heart rate of participants who hold a sensor underneath. Commissioned for the opening of the Center for Contemporary Culture in Moscow in the constructivist Bakhmetevsky Bus Garage, the piece is inspired by engineer Vladimir Shukov who worked with Melnikov on this emblematic building from 1926-28. View Details.
Pulse Tank
Pulse Tank
2008
"Pulse Tank" is an Interactive installation where the heart rates of members of the public are detected by sensors and converted into water waves in a ripple tank. A light show is created by the resulting waves and their interaction. To participate, insert your finger into one of the four cylinders on the side of the tank or put your hands flat on the front panel; the computer will detect your pulse and activate a solenoid which will hammer your heart rate onto the tank. View Details.
Microphones
Microphones
Subsculpture 10, 2008
"Microphones" is an interactive installation featuring one or several 1939-vintage Shure microphones, placed on mic stands around the exhibition room at different heights. Each microphone has been modified so that inside its head is a tiny loudspeaker and a circuit board connected to a network of hidden control computers. When a public member speaks into a microphone, it records his or her voice and immediately plays back the voice of a previous participant, as an echo from the past. View Details.
Less Than Three
Less Than Three
2008
"Less than Three" is an interactive installation of light strips that form a network between two intercoms. As a participant speaks into an intercom, their voice is translated into corresponding flashes of light and this light pattern is transmitted visually along one of the several possible pathways through the network. When it reaches the other side, the viewer's phrase is once again released as sound. Several voices can be carried simultaneously and the short contributions going fast through the network and the longer ones taking longer. View Details.
Reporters With Borders
Reporters With Borders
Shadow Box 6, 2007
"Reporters With Borders" is a high resolution interactive display that simultaneously shows 864 video clips of news anchors taken from TV broadcasts in the United States and Mexico. As the viewer stands in front of the piece his or her silhouette is shown on the display and within it reporters begin to talk. Every 5 minutes the piece switches the video clips - from a database of 1600 - and classifies them along gender, race and country, so that for instance on the left there are only American reporters and on the right only Mexicans. View Details.
Wavefunction
Wavefunction
Subsculpture 9, 2007
"Wavefunction" is a kinetic sculpture comprised of fifty to one hundred Charles and Ray Eames moulded chairs (designed in 1948) and placed in a regular array of rows, facing the entrance to the exhibition space. When someone approaches the work, a computerised surveillance system detects their presence and the closest chairs automatically begin to lift off the ground, creating the crest of a wave that then spreads over the whole room. View Details.
Blow Up
Blow Up
Shadow Box 4, 2007
"Blow-up" is a high resolution interactive display that is designed to fragment a surveillance camera view into 2400 virtual cameras that zoom into the exhibition space in fluid and autonomous motion. Inspired by Antonioni, the piece is intended as a an exercise to underline the construction of presence through a simulated, live compound eye. View Details.
Sustained Coincidence
Sustained Coincidence
Subsculpture 8, 2007
"Sustained Coincidence" is an interactive installation activated by the spatial relationships of visitors within a gallery. The piece consists of a series of incandescent lightbulbs that light up in reaction to the participants’ positions, in such a way that the shadows cast on the opposing wall are always overlapping. The piece is inspired by the phantasmagorias on the one hand and surveillance and digital analysis on the other. View Details.
Pulse Front
Pulse Front
Relational Architecture 12, 2007
"Pulse Front" was a matrix of light over Toronto's Harbourfront, made with lightbeams from twenty powerful robotic searchlights, entirely controlled by a network of sensors that measured the heart rate of passers-by. Ten metal sculptures detected the pulse of people who held them: the readings were immediately converted into light pulses by the computers and also determined the orientation of the beams. View Details.
Close-up
Close-up
Shadow Box 3, 2006
"Close-up" is the third piece of the ShadowBox series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows the viewer's shadow revealing hundreds of tiny videos of other people who have recently looked at the work. When a viewer approaches the piece, the system automatically starts recording and makes a video of him or her. Simultaneously, inside the viewer's silhouette videos are triggered that show up to 800 recent recordings. This piece presents a schizoid experience where our presence triggers a massive array of surveillance videos. View Details.
Third Person
Third Person
Shadow Box 2, 2006
"Third Person" is the second piece of the ShadowBox series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows the viewer's shadow revealing hundreds of tiny words that are in fact all the verbs of the dictionary conjugated in the third person. The portrait of the viewer is drawn in real time by active words, which appear automatically to fill his or her silhouette. The collector may choose to display the words in English, Spanish or French, or a combination of the three languages. View Details.
Eye Contact
Eye Contact
Shadow Box 1, 2006
"Eye Contact" is the first piece of the Shadow Box series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows eight hundred simultaneous videos of people lying down, resting. As soon as a public member is detected, his or her presence triggers the miniature video portraits to wake up: hundreds of people simultaneously turn to look at the visitor directly, creating an uncanny experience that questions who is the observer and who is the observed. View Details.
Homographies
Homographies
Subsculpture 7, 2006
"Homographies" is a large-scale interactive installation featuring a turbulent light array that responds to the movement of the public. The installation consists of 144 white fluorescent light tubes which are hung from 72 robotic fixtures on the ceiling of the exhibition space, equally spaced. Each light tube measures 1.83 m long and is rotated using a computer-controlled stepper motor. All lights are always on and typically constitute the only lighting in the exhibition hall, except for the natural light that spills into the space. View Details.
Pulse Room
Pulse Room
2006
"Pulse Room" is an interactive installation featuring one to three hundred clear incandescent light bulbs, 300 W each and hung from a cable at a height of three metres. The bulbs are uniformly distributed over the exhibition room, filling it completely. An interface placed on a side of the room has a sensor that detects the heart rate of participants. When someone holds the interface, a computer detects his or her pulse and immediately sets off the closest bulb to flash at the exact rhythm of his or her heart. View Details.
Entanglement
Entanglement
Subsculpture 6, 2005
"Entanglement" is an interactive installation that consists of two identical neon signs each measuring 182 x 38 cm. The signs simply say the word "Entanglement" a term used in quantum physics to describe the strange property exhibited by two particles that behave as one. The two signs are to be placed in two separate rooms, even if they are in different cities. Under each sign there is a normal light switch that turns it on and off. View Details.
Glories of Accounting
Glories of Accounting
Subsculpture 5, 2005
"Glories of Accounting" is an interactive installation with a surveillance system that detects the position of the public in the exhibition room. When someone walks into the room, large hands appear on the screen automatically. The hands rotate along their forearm axis, following the visitor with the open palms always facing him or her. As more people enter the room, more hands appear and each follows a member of the public. View Details.
Subtitled Public
Subtitled Public
2005
"Subtitled Public" consists of an empty exhibition space where visitors are detected by a computerised surveillance system. When people enter the space, the system generates a subtitle for each person and projects it onto him or her: the subtitle is chosen at random from a list of all the verbs conjugated in the third person. The only way of getting rid of a subtitle is to touch another person, which leads to the two subtitles being exchanged. View Details.
Under Scan
Under Scan
Relational Architecture 11, 2005
"Under Scan" is a public art installation based on self-representation. Thousands of "video-portraits" taken in Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton and Nottingham are projected onto the ground; at first, the portraits are not visible because the space is flooded by white light coming from a high-powered projector. As people walk around the area, their shadows are cast on the ground, revealing the video-portraits in short sequences. View Details.
Standards and Double Standards
Standards and Double Standards
Subsculpture 3, 2004
"Standards and Double Standards" is an interactive installation that consists of 10 to 100 fastened belts that are suspended at waist height from stepper motors on the ceiling of the exhibition room. Controlled by a computerized tracking system, the belts rotate automatically to follow the public, turning their buckles slowly to face passers-by. When several people are in the room their presence affects the entire group of belts, creating chaotic patterns of interference. Non-linear behaviours emerge such as turbulence, eddies and relatively quiet regions. View Details.
Sitestepper
Sitestepper
Relational Architecture 10, 2004
"Sitestepper" is an Internet program that shows a 3D view of an apparently "neutral" living room. This space can be transformed automatically by scanning a website to extract its images, texts, colours and sounds. The system analyzes the contents of the submitted webpage and uses them to furnish and decorate the room, "branding" the space with a layer of live media. This project was commissioned for LA MOCA's digital gallery. View Details.
Amodal Suspension
Amodal Suspension
Relational Architecture 8, 2003
"Amodal Suspension" is a large-scale interactive installation where people can send short text messages to each other using a cell phone or web browser. However, rather than being sent directly, the messages are encoded as unique sequences of flashes with twenty robotically-controlled searchlights, not unlike the patterns that make up Morse code. Messages "bounce" around from searchlight to searchlight, turning the sky into a giant switchboard. View Details.
Two Origins
Two Origins
Relational Architecture 7, 2002
In this intervention the emblematic Place du Capitole in Toulouse was transformed by a projection of The Book of Two Origins, a 13th-century heretical manuscript compiling the theological beliefs of the dualist cathars. Once a vibrant community in several regions of Europe, the believers in the two origins of the Universe were virtually annihilated by the brutal crusades that gave birth to the Inquisition and France's expansion. The texts are illegible since they are projected overlapping each other on the same façade from two distant projectors; only when passers-by block one text with their bodies is it possible to read the other text inside their shadow. View Details.
Body Movies
Body Movies
Relational Architecture 6, 2001
"Body Movies" transforms public space with interactive projections measuring between 400 and 1,800 square metres. Thousands of photographic portraits, previously taken on the streets of the host city, are shown using robotically controlled projectors. However the portraits only appear inside the projected shadows of the passers-by, whose silhouettes can measure between two and twenty-five metres depending on how close or far away they are from the powerful light sources positioned on the ground. View Details.
33 Questions per Minute
33 Questions per Minute
Relational Architecture 5, 2000
"33 Questions Per Minute" consists of a computer program which uses grammatical rules to combine words from a dictionary and generate 55 billion unique, fortuitous questions. The automated questions are presented at a rate of 33 per minute --the threshold of legibility-- on 21 tiny LCD screens encrusted on the support columns of the exhibition hall or mounted on a wall. The system will take over 3,000 years to ask all possible questions. A keyboard allows participants to log on to the building and add their own questions to the automatic flow. View Details.
Vectorial Elevation
Vectorial Elevation
Relational Architecture 4, 1999
"Vectorial Elevation" is an interactive art project originally designed to celebrate the arrival of the year 2000 in Mexico City's Zócalo Square. The website www.alzado.net enabled any Internet user to design light sculptures over the city's historic centre, with eighteen searchlights positioned around the square. These searchlights, whose powerful beams could be seen within a 15 kilometers radius, were controlled by an online 3D simulation program and visualised by digital cameras. A personalised webpage was produced for every participant with images of their design and information such as their name, dedication, place of access and comments. View Details.
Re:Positioning Fear
Re:Positioning Fear
Relational Architecture 3, 1997
"Re:Positioning Fear" was the third relational architecture project. A large scale installation on the Landeszeughaus military arsenal with a "teleabsence" interface of projected shadows of passers-by. Using tracking systems, the shadows were automatically focused and generated sounds. A real-time IRC discussion about the transformation of the concept of "fear" was projected inside the shadows; the chat involved 30 artists and theorists from 17 countries. View Details.
Displaced Emperors
Displaced Emperors
Relational Architecture 2, 1997
"Displaced Emperors" was an installation that used an "architact" interface to transform the Habsburg Castle in Linz, Austria. Wireless 3D sensors calculated where participants pointed to on the façade and a large animated projection of a hand was shown at that location. As people on the street "caressed" the building, they could reveal the interiors of the Habsburg residence in Mexico City, Castillo de Chapultepec. View Details.
Surface Tension
Surface Tension
1992
"Surface Tension" is an interactive installation where an image of a giant human eye follows the observer with orwellian precision.This work was inspired by a reading of Georges Bataille's text The Solar Anus during the first Gulf War: first wide-spread deployment of camera-guided "intelligent bombs". Present-day computerised surveillance techniques employed by the Department of Homeland Security in the United States through the Patriot Act, provide a new and distressing backdrop for this piece. View Details.
33 Questions per Minute
33 Questions per Minute
Relational Architecture 5, 2000
"33 Questions Per Minute" consists of a computer program which uses grammatical rules to combine words from a dictionary and generate 55 billion unique, fortuitous questions. The automated questions are presented at a rate of 33 per minute --the threshold of legibility-- on 21 tiny LCD screens encrusted on the support columns of the exhibition hall or mounted on a wall. The system will take over 3,000 years to ask all possible questions. A keyboard allows participants to log on to the building and add their own questions to the automatic flow. View Details.
Airborne Projection
Airborne Projection
Relational Architecture 20, 2013
“Airborne” was an interactive installation commissioned by the Chrysler Museum of Art to transform Norfolk’s public space into a poetic shadow play. Participants blocked the light of two projectors casting their shadows on a 900 sqm wall, and these were tracked by computerized surveillance systems. Out of the shadows emanated bellowing smoke which was mapped onto the wall and accumulated in it. Readable within the smoke were clouds of text, themselves turbulent, from salient poetic texts on light and shadow. View Details.
Alpha Blend
Alpha Blend
Shadow Box 7, 2008
"Alpha Blend" is the seventh piece in the Shadow Box series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows the viewer's presence revealing and blending pictures of people who have recently looked at the work. A game of "reverse puppetry" ensues, where a portrait from the past is animated by a live presence, in a similar preceptual mechanism than the one used in Lozano-Hemmer's public art installation "Body Movies". View Details.
Amodal Suspension
Amodal Suspension
Relational Architecture 8, 2003
"Amodal Suspension" is a large-scale interactive installation where people can send short text messages to each other using a cell phone or web browser. However, rather than being sent directly, the messages are encoded as unique sequences of flashes with twenty robotically-controlled searchlights, not unlike the patterns that make up Morse code. Messages "bounce" around from searchlight to searchlight, turning the sky into a giant switchboard. View Details.
Articulated Intersect
Articulated Intersect
Relational Architecture 18, 2011
“Articulated Intersect” is a large-scale installation that produces an interactive canopy of light that can be modified by the public using six large lever-controllers that protrude from the ground. As a participant points one of these levers three powerful robotic searchlights automatically intersect in the sky to create an apex at that location. The participant may direct the apex anywhere over the city in real-time, creating an animated tetrahedron inspired by the work of Richard Buckminster Fuller. View Details.
Blow Up
Blow Up
Shadow Box 4, 2007
"Blow-up" is a high resolution interactive display that is designed to fragment a surveillance camera view into 2400 virtual cameras that zoom into the exhibition space in fluid and autonomous motion. Inspired by Antonioni, the piece is intended as a an exercise to underline the construction of presence through a simulated, live compound eye. View Details.
Body Movies
Body Movies
Relational Architecture 6, 2001
"Body Movies" transforms public space with interactive projections measuring between 400 and 1,800 square metres. Thousands of photographic portraits, previously taken on the streets of the host city, are shown using robotically controlled projectors. However the portraits only appear inside the projected shadows of the passers-by, whose silhouettes can measure between two and twenty-five metres depending on how close or far away they are from the powerful light sources positioned on the ground. View Details.
Cardinal Directions
Cardinal Directions
Subsculpture 11, 2010
"Cardinal Directions", 2010, is a kinetic sculpture which consists of a surveillance monitor that displays an extract of Vicente Huidobro´s poem “Altazor” (1919-1931). Refering to the geography of his native Chile, Huidobro wrote “The four cardinal directions are three: North and South”. When a presence is detected by infrared sensors, the monitor starts to rotate. As the poem is “geolocated” it always aligns itself to the cardinal points, and the public must walk around the piece in order to read it, like a kind of periscope. View Details.
Close-up
Close-up
Shadow Box 3, 2006
"Close-up" is the third piece of the ShadowBox series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows the viewer's shadow revealing hundreds of tiny videos of other people who have recently looked at the work. When a viewer approaches the piece, the system automatically starts recording and makes a video of him or her. Simultaneously, inside the viewer's silhouette videos are triggered that show up to 800 recent recordings. This piece presents a schizoid experience where our presence triggers a massive array of surveillance videos. View Details.
Displaced Emperors
Displaced Emperors
Relational Architecture 2, 1997
"Displaced Emperors" was an installation that used an "architact" interface to transform the Habsburg Castle in Linz, Austria. Wireless 3D sensors calculated where participants pointed to on the façade and a large animated projection of a hand was shown at that location. As people on the street "caressed" the building, they could reveal the interiors of the Habsburg residence in Mexico City, Castillo de Chapultepec. View Details.
Entanglement
Entanglement
Subsculpture 6, 2005
"Entanglement" is an interactive installation that consists of two identical neon signs each measuring 182 x 38 cm. The signs simply say the word "Entanglement" a term used in quantum physics to describe the strange property exhibited by two particles that behave as one. The two signs are to be placed in two separate rooms, even if they are in different cities. Under each sign there is a normal light switch that turns it on and off. View Details.
Eye Contact
Eye Contact
Shadow Box 1, 2006
"Eye Contact" is the first piece of the Shadow Box series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows eight hundred simultaneous videos of people lying down, resting. As soon as a public member is detected, his or her presence triggers the miniature video portraits to wake up: hundreds of people simultaneously turn to look at the visitor directly, creating an uncanny experience that questions who is the observer and who is the observed. View Details.
Friendfracker
Friendfracker
2013
Friendfracker is a service that automatically deletes a set of friends from your Facebook account. Upon authenticating your data on the website, the service deletes 1 to 10 friends at random. The project was developed with Harper Reed for Rhizome's 7 on 7 conference. View Details.
Glories of Accounting
Glories of Accounting
Subsculpture 5, 2005
"Glories of Accounting" is an interactive installation with a surveillance system that detects the position of the public in the exhibition room. When someone walks into the room, large hands appear on the screen automatically. The hands rotate along their forearm axis, following the visitor with the open palms always facing him or her. As more people enter the room, more hands appear and each follows a member of the public. View Details.
Homographies
Homographies
Subsculpture 7, 2006
"Homographies" is a large-scale interactive installation featuring a turbulent light array that responds to the movement of the public. The installation consists of 144 white fluorescent light tubes which are hung from 72 robotic fixtures on the ceiling of the exhibition space, equally spaced. Each light tube measures 1.83 m long and is rotated using a computer-controlled stepper motor. All lights are always on and typically constitute the only lighting in the exhibition hall, except for the natural light that spills into the space. View Details.
Less Than Three
Less Than Three
2008
"Less than Three" is an interactive installation of light strips that form a network between two intercoms. As a participant speaks into an intercom, their voice is translated into corresponding flashes of light and this light pattern is transmitted visually along one of the several possible pathways through the network. When it reaches the other side, the viewer's phrase is once again released as sound. Several voices can be carried simultaneously and the short contributions going fast through the network and the longer ones taking longer. View Details.
Make Out
Make Out
Shadow Box 8 , 2008
"Make Out" is the eight piece in the Shadow Box series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows thousands of internet videos of couples looking at each other: as soon as someone stands in front of the display his or her silhouette is shown and all the couples within it begin to kiss. The massive array of make-out sessions continues for as long as someone is in front of the work, --as he or she moves away all the kissing ends. View Details.
Microphones
Microphones
Subsculpture 10, 2008
"Microphones" is an interactive installation featuring one or several 1939-vintage Shure microphones, placed on mic stands around the exhibition room at different heights. Each microphone has been modified so that inside its head is a tiny loudspeaker and a circuit board connected to a network of hidden control computers. When a public member speaks into a microphone, it records his or her voice and immediately plays back the voice of a previous participant, as an echo from the past. View Details.
Nave Solar
Nave Solar
2011
Nave Solar is an interactive installation featuring a fake Sun that is activated by the pendular motion of the public as they hang from a rope and swing along the nave of a 16th Century catholic inquisition church. Using tracking systems, the installation detects the motion of participants and generates smoke that accumulates on the ceiling of the apse as well as activates the Sun's flares, surface turbulence and sun spots. View Details.
Please Empty Your Pockets
Please Empty Your Pockets
Subsculpture 12, 2010
Please Empty your Pockets is an installation that consists of a conveyor belt with a scanner that records and accumulates everything that passes under it. The public may place any small object on the conveyor belt: once it passes under the scanner, the object reappears on the other side beside projected objects from the memory of the installation. As a real item is removed from the conveyor belt, it leaves behind a projected image of itself, which is then used to accompany future objects. The piece remembers up to 600,000 objects which are displayed beside new ones that are added to the installation. View Details.
Pulse Corniche
Pulse Corniche
Relational Architecture 22, 2015
Pulse Corniche was an interactive canopy of powerful light beams projected into to the sky by robotic searchlights whose brightness and orientation was controlled by the heart-rate of visitors to the Abu Dhabi’s Corniche. People were free to participate by holding a sensor placed in the centre of the plaza that converted the electrical activity of their heart into a unique lighting sequence. The intensity and direction of the lights visualized the different biometric rhythms of each participant, in an urban scale. View Details.
Pulse Front
Pulse Front
Relational Architecture 12, 2007
"Pulse Front" was a matrix of light over Toronto's Harbourfront, made with lightbeams from twenty powerful robotic searchlights, entirely controlled by a network of sensors that measured the heart rate of passers-by. Ten metal sculptures detected the pulse of people who held them: the readings were immediately converted into light pulses by the computers and also determined the orientation of the beams. View Details.
Pulse Index
Pulse Index
2010
"Pulse Index" is an interactive installation that records participants’ fingerprints at the same time as their heart rates. The piece displays data for the last 765 and over participants in a stepped display that creates a horizon line of skin. As new recordings are added, the oldest ones disappear, —a kind of memento mori. To participate, people introduce their finger into a custom-made sensor equipped with a digital microscope and a heart rate sensor; their fingerprint immediately appears on the largest cell of the display, pulsating to their heart beat. View Details.
Pulse Park
Pulse Park
Relational Architecture 14, 2008
"Pulse Park" is comprised of a matrix of light beams that graze the central oval field of Madison Square Park. Their intensity is entirely modulated by a sensor that measures the heart rate of participants and the resulting effect is the visualization of vital signs, arguably our most symbolic biometric, in an urban scale. View Details.
Pulse Room
Pulse Room
2006
"Pulse Room" is an interactive installation featuring one to three hundred clear incandescent light bulbs, 300 W each and hung from a cable at a height of three metres. The bulbs are uniformly distributed over the exhibition room, filling it completely. An interface placed on a side of the room has a sensor that detects the heart rate of participants. When someone holds the interface, a computer detects his or her pulse and immediately sets off the closest bulb to flash at the exact rhythm of his or her heart. View Details.
Pulse Spiral
Pulse Spiral
2008
"Pulse Spiral" is a three-dimensional spiral paraboloid made up of 400 lightbulbs arranged according to Fermat's equations, which records and responds to the heart rate of participants who hold a sensor underneath. Commissioned for the opening of the Center for Contemporary Culture in Moscow in the constructivist Bakhmetevsky Bus Garage, the piece is inspired by engineer Vladimir Shukov who worked with Melnikov on this emblematic building from 1926-28. View Details.
Pulse Tank
Pulse Tank
2008
"Pulse Tank" is an Interactive installation where the heart rates of members of the public are detected by sensors and converted into water waves in a ripple tank. A light show is created by the resulting waves and their interaction. To participate, insert your finger into one of the four cylinders on the side of the tank or put your hands flat on the front panel; the computer will detect your pulse and activate a solenoid which will hammer your heart rate onto the tank. View Details.
Re:Positioning Fear
Re:Positioning Fear
Relational Architecture 3, 1997
"Re:Positioning Fear" was the third relational architecture project. A large scale installation on the Landeszeughaus military arsenal with a "teleabsence" interface of projected shadows of passers-by. Using tracking systems, the shadows were automatically focused and generated sounds. A real-time IRC discussion about the transformation of the concept of "fear" was projected inside the shadows; the chat involved 30 artists and theorists from 17 countries. View Details.
Reporters With Borders
Reporters With Borders
Shadow Box 6, 2007
"Reporters With Borders" is a high resolution interactive display that simultaneously shows 864 video clips of news anchors taken from TV broadcasts in the United States and Mexico. As the viewer stands in front of the piece his or her silhouette is shown on the display and within it reporters begin to talk. Every 5 minutes the piece switches the video clips - from a database of 1600 - and classifies them along gender, race and country, so that for instance on the left there are only American reporters and on the right only Mexicans. View Details.
Seismoscopes
Seismoscopes
2009
The series "Seismoscopes" consists of devices that detect vibration around them, from footsteps to earthquakes, and record this vibration on paper using an automated XY-plotter. As each Seismoscope registers any seismic wave it is programmed to draw an illustration of a single Skeptical philosopher, over and over again. View Details.
Sitestepper
Sitestepper
Relational Architecture 10, 2004
"Sitestepper" is an Internet program that shows a 3D view of an apparently "neutral" living room. This space can be transformed automatically by scanning a website to extract its images, texts, colours and sounds. The system analyzes the contents of the submitted webpage and uses them to furnish and decorate the room, "branding" the space with a layer of live media. This project was commissioned for LA MOCA's digital gallery. View Details.
Solar Equation
Solar Equation
Relational Architecture 16, 2010
"Solar Equation" is a large-scale public art installation that consists of a faithful simulation of the Sun, 100 million times smaller than the real thing. Commissioned by the Light in Winter Festival in Melbourne, the piece features the world’s largest spherical balloon, custom-manufactured for the project, which is tethered over Federation Square and animated using five projectors. The solar animation on the balloon is generated by live mathematical equations that simulate the turbulence, flares and sunspots that can be seen on the surface of the Sun. This produces a constantly changing display that never repeats itself, giving viewers a glimpse of the majestic phenomena that are observable at the solar surface and that only relatively recent advances in astronomy have discovered. Using an iPhone, iPod touch or iPad, people may disturb the animations in real-time and select different fluid dynamic visualizations. View Details.
Standards and Double Standards
Standards and Double Standards
Subsculpture 3, 2004
"Standards and Double Standards" is an interactive installation that consists of 10 to 100 fastened belts that are suspended at waist height from stepper motors on the ceiling of the exhibition room. Controlled by a computerized tracking system, the belts rotate automatically to follow the public, turning their buckles slowly to face passers-by. When several people are in the room their presence affects the entire group of belts, creating chaotic patterns of interference. Non-linear behaviours emerge such as turbulence, eddies and relatively quiet regions. View Details.
Subtitled Public
Subtitled Public
2005
"Subtitled Public" consists of an empty exhibition space where visitors are detected by a computerised surveillance system. When people enter the space, the system generates a subtitle for each person and projects it onto him or her: the subtitle is chosen at random from a list of all the verbs conjugated in the third person. The only way of getting rid of a subtitle is to touch another person, which leads to the two subtitles being exchanged. View Details.
Surface Tension
Surface Tension
1992
"Surface Tension" is an interactive installation where an image of a giant human eye follows the observer with orwellian precision.This work was inspired by a reading of Georges Bataille's text The Solar Anus during the first Gulf War: first wide-spread deployment of camera-guided "intelligent bombs". Present-day computerised surveillance techniques employed by the Department of Homeland Security in the United States through the Patriot Act, provide a new and distressing backdrop for this piece. View Details.
Sustained Coincidence
Sustained Coincidence
Subsculpture 8, 2007
"Sustained Coincidence" is an interactive installation activated by the spatial relationships of visitors within a gallery. The piece consists of a series of incandescent lightbulbs that light up in reaction to the participants’ positions, in such a way that the shadows cast on the opposing wall are always overlapping. The piece is inspired by the phantasmagorias on the one hand and surveillance and digital analysis on the other. View Details.
Tape Recorders
Tape Recorders
Subsculpture 14, 2011
Rows of motorised measuring tapes record the amount of time that visitors stay in the installation. As a computerised tracking system detects the presence of a person, the closest measuring tape starts to project upwards. When the tape reaches around 3 meters high it crashes and recoils back. Each hour, the system prints the total number of minutes spent by the sum of all visitors. View Details.
The Company of Colours
The Company of Colours
Shadow Box 9, 2009
"The Company of Colours" is the ninth piece in the Shadow Box series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows the live camera view constructed out of a palette of named colour swatches that can be rendered by computers. Every few minutes the piece automatically switches to show the live view made with a variety of culturally-significant colour palettes from computer and videogame history, including the 4 shades of green of the original Nintendo Gameboy, the eight colours of teletext, and the sixteen colours of the Commodore 64, the Apple II and the ZX Spectrum. View Details.
Third Person
Third Person
Shadow Box 2, 2006
"Third Person" is the second piece of the ShadowBox series of interactive displays with a built-in computerized tracking system. This piece shows the viewer's shadow revealing hundreds of tiny words that are in fact all the verbs of the dictionary conjugated in the third person. The portrait of the viewer is drawn in real time by active words, which appear automatically to fill his or her silhouette. The collector may choose to display the words in English, Spanish or French, or a combination of the three languages. View Details.
Two Origins
Two Origins
Relational Architecture 7, 2002
In this intervention the emblematic Place du Capitole in Toulouse was transformed by a projection of The Book of Two Origins, a 13th-century heretical manuscript compiling the theological beliefs of the dualist cathars. Once a vibrant community in several regions of Europe, the believers in the two origins of the Universe were virtually annihilated by the brutal crusades that gave birth to the Inquisition and France's expansion. The texts are illegible since they are projected overlapping each other on the same façade from two distant projectors; only when passers-by block one text with their bodies is it possible to read the other text inside their shadow. View Details.
Under Scan
Under Scan
Relational Architecture 11, 2005
"Under Scan" is a public art installation based on self-representation. Thousands of "video-portraits" taken in Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton and Nottingham are projected onto the ground; at first, the portraits are not visible because the space is flooded by white light coming from a high-powered projector. As people walk around the area, their shadows are cast on the ground, revealing the video-portraits in short sequences. View Details.
Vectorial Elevation
Vectorial Elevation
Relational Architecture 4, 1999
"Vectorial Elevation" is an interactive art project originally designed to celebrate the arrival of the year 2000 in Mexico City's Zócalo Square. The website www.alzado.net enabled any Internet user to design light sculptures over the city's historic centre, with eighteen searchlights positioned around the square. These searchlights, whose powerful beams could be seen within a 15 kilometers radius, were controlled by an online 3D simulation program and visualised by digital cameras. A personalised webpage was produced for every participant with images of their design and information such as their name, dedication, place of access and comments. View Details.
Voice Array
Voice Array
Subsculpture 13, 2011
As a participant speaks into an intercom, his or her voice is automatically translated into flashes of light and then the unique blinking pattern is stored as a loop in the first light of the array. Each new recording pushes all previous recordings one position down and gradually one can hear the cumulative sound of the 288 previous recordings. The voice that was pushed out of the array can then be heard by itself. View Details.
Voz Alta
Voz Alta
Relational Architecture 15, 2008
"Voz Alta" (Loud Voice) is a memorial commissioned for the 40th anniversary of the student massacre in Tlatelolco. Participants who speak into a megaphone automatically control the brightness of four searchlights that relay their voice over Mexico City as quiet light flashes; tuning into 96.1FM radio allows people anywhere in the city to listen in live to what the lights are saying. View Details.
Wavefunction
Wavefunction
Subsculpture 9, 2007
"Wavefunction" is a kinetic sculpture comprised of fifty to one hundred Charles and Ray Eames moulded chairs (designed in 1948) and placed in a regular array of rows, facing the entrance to the exhibition space. When someone approaches the work, a computerised surveillance system detects their presence and the closest chairs automatically begin to lift off the ground, creating the crest of a wave that then spreads over the whole room. View Details.
Zero Noon
Zero Noon
2013
“Zero Noon” is a digital clock that shows the current time according to eccentric metrics: it uses hundreds of different internet-refreshed statistics. The clock's reference systems are all synchronized so that precisely at noon they all zero and start over. The public may change the statistics by manually scrolling through the list using small push-buttons under the built-in display. The metrics come from government data, Harper’s Magazine, financial institutions, NGOs, academic studies and other trusted sources. View Details.