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Call on Water
Call on Water
2016
Call on Water is a fountain that writes words in mid-air with plumes of cold vapour that ascend from a water basin. Dozens of poems by Mexican writer Octavio Paz are presented which describe readable air, the moment when the written word is spoken and becomes the atmosphere itself. The poems’ content becomes tangible briefly, almost breathable, then disappears in turbulence. View Details.
Sway
Sway
2016
“Sway” is a kinetic sculpture that responds to data; it is a computer-controlled metronome that oscillates to the rhythm of a specific statistic. The rope was braided onto a thin vertical steel rod to make it stand upright and the floor rope acts as a free-standing base. The piece stands on a wooden plinth which contains a small motor and an electrical circuit that makes the noose sway and pendulate almost imperceptibly from time to time. The sway adds to the trompe l’oeil effect of the rope hanging upside-down. The collector or curator may choose the frequency with which the rope sways, with the default value being around once every 40 to 60 seconds, which represents the rate of homicides in the World. View Details.
Babbage Nanopamphlets
Babbage Nanopamphlets
2015
Two million pamphlets were printed in elemental gold, higher in purity than 24-karat gold, using nanotechnology techniques. Around 250,000 copies were released in the exhibition room so they remain floating around in the air, potentially inhaled by the public. These pamphlets are 150 atoms thick and are biologically inert so pose no health risk. The rest of the pamphlets are shown suspended in water together with images taken by an electron microscope. The text engraved onto the gold leaflets is an excerpt from the Ninth Bridgewater Treatise (1837) by Charles Babbage. The text posits that the atmosphere is a vast repository of everything that has ever been said and that we could potentially “rewind” the movement of every molecule of air to recreate the voices of everyone who has spoken in the past. View Details.
Pan-Anthem
Pan-Anthem
Subsculpture 16, 2014
"Pan-Anthem" is an interactive sound installation where the national anthem of every country in the World plays back on a movable speaker that is magnetically attached to a large wall. The speakers are precisely arranged to visualize national statistics: population, GDP, area, number of women in parliament, GINI, year of independence, HDI and so on. For example, when the work is configured to show military spending per capita, on the far left of the wall the public can hear the anthems of countries without military forces like Costa Rica, Iceland and Andorra while at the far right they can hear Saudi Arabia, Israel and the United States, which spend more than $2,000 per person per year. If no one is in the exhibition room all the speakers are silent, but as a visitor approaches a particular set of speakers these start playing automatically, creating a positional panoramic playback of anthems associated to similar statistics View Details.
Nineteen Eighty-Four
Nineteen Eighty-Four
2014
"Nineteen Eighty-Four" is an interactive display that shows house address numbers extracted from Google Street View images. The display writes over 22 billion different combinations of the number 1984, which change at a user-specified speed. Typing any number onto an onboard keyboard starts a count-down or count-up until eventually the number 1984 is reached. View Details.
Method Random
Method Random
2014
“Method Random” is a series of chromogenic prints that have been generated by computational methods that attempt to create randomness. Random number generators (RNG) are essential algorithms for a large number of applications from encryption and security to simulation, jury selection, double-blind trials, statistical sampling, game theory and many others. While the sum of all colours picked by different RNG algorithms generates a neutral gray, patterns can be discerned when massive number of pixels can be seen simultaneously. These prints show how human perception of organization can often spot the fundamental difficulty for computers to appear unpredictable. View Details.
Sphere Packing
Sphere Packing
Subsculpture 15, 2013
"Sphere Packing" is a series of 3D-printed pieces designed to concentrate the entire musical production of a composer in a single dense multi-channel device. The size of each sphere is directly proportional to how prolific the composer was, for example the sphere for Johann Sebastian Bach has 48 cm diameter and holds 1100 loudspeakers playing simultaneously Bach's 1100 different compositions, while the sphere for Hildegaard Von Bingen only has 11 cm diameter and 69 loudspeakers. The project presents at a glance the comparative production volume of many composers. As people are a couple metres away from a sphere they hear a quiet murmur of sounds, but as they approach and put their ear up close to individual speakers they can hone in on specific compositions. View Details.
Airborne Projection
Airborne Projection
Relational Architecture 20, 2013
“Airborne” was an interactive installation commissioned by the Chrysler Museum of Art to transform Norfolk’s public space into a poetic shadow play. Participants blocked the light of two projectors casting their shadows on a 900 sqm wall, and these were tracked by computerized surveillance systems. Out of the shadows emanated bellowing smoke which was mapped onto the wall and accumulated in it. Readable within the smoke were clouds of text, themselves turbulent, from salient poetic texts on light and shadow. View Details.
Nave Solar
Nave Solar
2011
Nave Solar is an interactive installation featuring a fake Sun that is activated by the pendular motion of the public as they hang from a rope and swing along the nave of a 16th Century catholic inquisition church. Using tracking systems, the installation detects the motion of participants and generates smoke that accumulates on the ceiling of the apse as well as activates the Sun's flares, surface turbulence and sun spots. View Details.
Flatsun
Flatsun
2011
A circular display that simulates the turbulence at the surface of the Sun using mathematical equations. The piece reacts to the presence of the public by varying the speed and type of animation displayed. If no one is in front of the piece the turbulence slows down and eventually turns off. As the built-in camera detects people, more solar flares are generated and the fake Sun shows more perturbation and activity. At 140 cm diameter, Flatsun is exactly a billion times smaller than the real Sun. View Details.
The Year's Midnight
The Year's Midnight
2011
"The Year's Midnight" is an interactive installation that shows the viewers' image on screen, unprocessed, except for plumes of white or black smoke that emanate from their eye sockets until the whole display is filled with a dense smog. Live and recorded eyeballs extracted from the video accumulate on the bottom of the display, similar to traditional representations of St. Lucy. The project's name is the beginning of John Donne's "A Nocturnal Upon St. Lucy's Day, Being the Shortest Day", a mournful poem which inspires this work. View Details.
X is not the new Y
X is not the new Y
2011
A small format artwork where over 500,000 combinations of proper names, companies and cities are presented as random inequalities by two electronic paper displays. View Details.
Solar Equation
Solar Equation
Relational Architecture 16, 2010
"Solar Equation" is a large-scale public art installation that consists of a faithful simulation of the Sun, 100 million times smaller than the real thing. Commissioned by the Light in Winter Festival in Melbourne, the piece features the world’s largest spherical balloon, custom-manufactured for the project, which is tethered over Federation Square and animated using five projectors. The solar animation on the balloon is generated by live mathematical equations that simulate the turbulence, flares and sunspots that can be seen on the surface of the Sun. This produces a constantly changing display that never repeats itself, giving viewers a glimpse of the majestic phenomena that are observable at the solar surface and that only relatively recent advances in astronomy have discovered. Using an iPhone, iPod touch or iPad, people may disturb the animations in real-time and select different fluid dynamic visualizations. View Details.
Levels of Nothingness
Levels of Nothingness
Performers 1, 2009
An installation-performance commissioned for the 50th Anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum, inspired by Kandinsky's opera, "The Yellow Sound" (1912). In "Levels of Nothingness", the human voice is analyzed by computers, automatically controlling a full rig of Rock-and-Roll concert lighting and creating an interactive colour show. For the New York performances, Isabella Rossellini read a libretto co-written by Brian Massumi, which included seminal philosophical texts on skepticism, color and perception, including writings by Kandinsky, Deleuze, Sanches, Simon Baron-Cohen and Alexander Luria. Following the performances, audience members could test the color-generating microphone. View Details.
Seismoscopes
Seismoscopes
2009
The series "Seismoscopes" consists of devices that detect vibration around them, from footsteps to earthquakes, and record this vibration on paper using an automated XY-plotter. As each Seismoscope registers any seismic wave it is programmed to draw an illustration of a single Skeptical philosopher, over and over again. View Details.
Navier-Stokes
Navier-Stokes
2009
"Navier-Stokes" is a series of computer-controlled lightboxes that show satellite pictures of border regions that have a vector of economic disparity, a history of military conflict or heavy migratory traffic. Instead of using regular white fluorescent light tubes to illuminate the print, the pieces have over one hundred thousand light emitting diodes (LEDs), which can highlight tiny features within the image. The first piece shows the Tijuana-San Diego border with Mexico illuminated red by default while the US is dark. View Details.
Wavefunction
Wavefunction
Subsculpture 9, 2007
"Wavefunction" is a kinetic sculpture comprised of fifty to one hundred Charles and Ray Eames moulded chairs (designed in 1948) and placed in a regular array of rows, facing the entrance to the exhibition space. When someone approaches the work, a computerised surveillance system detects their presence and the closest chairs automatically begin to lift off the ground, creating the crest of a wave that then spreads over the whole room. View Details.
Homographies
Homographies
Subsculpture 7, 2006
"Homographies" is a large-scale interactive installation featuring a turbulent light array that responds to the movement of the public. The installation consists of 144 white fluorescent light tubes which are hung from 72 robotic fixtures on the ceiling of the exhibition space, equally spaced. Each light tube measures 1.83 m long and is rotated using a computer-controlled stepper motor. All lights are always on and typically constitute the only lighting in the exhibition hall, except for the natural light that spills into the space. View Details.
Synaptic Caguamas
Synaptic Caguamas
Subsculpture 4, 2004
"Synaptic Caguamas" is a kinetic sculpture consisting of a motorized Mexican "cantina" bar table with 30 "Caguama"-sized beer bottles (1-litre each). The bottles spin on the table with patterns generated by cellular automata algorithms that simulate the neuronal connections in the brain. Every few minutes the bottles are reset automatically and seeded with new initial conditions for the algorithm, so that the movement patterns are never repeated. View Details.
Standards and Double Standards
Standards and Double Standards
Subsculpture 3, 2004
"Standards and Double Standards" is an interactive installation that consists of 10 to 100 fastened belts that are suspended at waist height from stepper motors on the ceiling of the exhibition room. Controlled by a computerized tracking system, the belts rotate automatically to follow the public, turning their buckles slowly to face passers-by. When several people are in the room their presence affects the entire group of belts, creating chaotic patterns of interference. Non-linear behaviours emerge such as turbulence, eddies and relatively quiet regions. View Details.
Sitestepper
Sitestepper
Relational Architecture 10, 2004
"Sitestepper" is an Internet program that shows a 3D view of an apparently "neutral" living room. This space can be transformed automatically by scanning a website to extract its images, texts, colours and sounds. The system analyzes the contents of the submitted webpage and uses them to furnish and decorate the room, "branding" the space with a layer of live media. This project was commissioned for LA MOCA's digital gallery. View Details.
33 Questions per Minute
33 Questions per Minute
Relational Architecture 5, 2000
"33 Questions Per Minute" consists of a computer program which uses grammatical rules to combine words from a dictionary and generate 55 billion unique, fortuitous questions. The automated questions are presented at a rate of 33 per minute --the threshold of legibility-- on 21 tiny LCD screens encrusted on the support columns of the exhibition hall or mounted on a wall. The system will take over 3,000 years to ask all possible questions. A keyboard allows participants to log on to the building and add their own questions to the automatic flow. View Details.
Displaced Emperors
Displaced Emperors
Relational Architecture 2, 1997
"Displaced Emperors" was an installation that used an "architact" interface to transform the Habsburg Castle in Linz, Austria. Wireless 3D sensors calculated where participants pointed to on the façade and a large animated projection of a hand was shown at that location. As people on the street "caressed" the building, they could reveal the interiors of the Habsburg residence in Mexico City, Castillo de Chapultepec. View Details.
33 Questions per Minute
33 Questions per Minute
Relational Architecture 5, 2000
"33 Questions Per Minute" consists of a computer program which uses grammatical rules to combine words from a dictionary and generate 55 billion unique, fortuitous questions. The automated questions are presented at a rate of 33 per minute --the threshold of legibility-- on 21 tiny LCD screens encrusted on the support columns of the exhibition hall or mounted on a wall. The system will take over 3,000 years to ask all possible questions. A keyboard allows participants to log on to the building and add their own questions to the automatic flow. View Details.
Airborne Projection
Airborne Projection
Relational Architecture 20, 2013
“Airborne” was an interactive installation commissioned by the Chrysler Museum of Art to transform Norfolk’s public space into a poetic shadow play. Participants blocked the light of two projectors casting their shadows on a 900 sqm wall, and these were tracked by computerized surveillance systems. Out of the shadows emanated bellowing smoke which was mapped onto the wall and accumulated in it. Readable within the smoke were clouds of text, themselves turbulent, from salient poetic texts on light and shadow. View Details.
Babbage Nanopamphlets
Babbage Nanopamphlets
2015
Two million pamphlets were printed in elemental gold, higher in purity than 24-karat gold, using nanotechnology techniques. Around 250,000 copies were released in the exhibition room so they remain floating around in the air, potentially inhaled by the public. These pamphlets are 150 atoms thick and are biologically inert so pose no health risk. The rest of the pamphlets are shown suspended in water together with images taken by an electron microscope. The text engraved onto the gold leaflets is an excerpt from the Ninth Bridgewater Treatise (1837) by Charles Babbage. The text posits that the atmosphere is a vast repository of everything that has ever been said and that we could potentially “rewind” the movement of every molecule of air to recreate the voices of everyone who has spoken in the past. View Details.
Call on Water
Call on Water
2016
Call on Water is a fountain that writes words in mid-air with plumes of cold vapour that ascend from a water basin. Dozens of poems by Mexican writer Octavio Paz are presented which describe readable air, the moment when the written word is spoken and becomes the atmosphere itself. The poems’ content becomes tangible briefly, almost breathable, then disappears in turbulence. View Details.
Displaced Emperors
Displaced Emperors
Relational Architecture 2, 1997
"Displaced Emperors" was an installation that used an "architact" interface to transform the Habsburg Castle in Linz, Austria. Wireless 3D sensors calculated where participants pointed to on the façade and a large animated projection of a hand was shown at that location. As people on the street "caressed" the building, they could reveal the interiors of the Habsburg residence in Mexico City, Castillo de Chapultepec. View Details.
Flatsun
Flatsun
2011
A circular display that simulates the turbulence at the surface of the Sun using mathematical equations. The piece reacts to the presence of the public by varying the speed and type of animation displayed. If no one is in front of the piece the turbulence slows down and eventually turns off. As the built-in camera detects people, more solar flares are generated and the fake Sun shows more perturbation and activity. At 140 cm diameter, Flatsun is exactly a billion times smaller than the real Sun. View Details.
Homographies
Homographies
Subsculpture 7, 2006
"Homographies" is a large-scale interactive installation featuring a turbulent light array that responds to the movement of the public. The installation consists of 144 white fluorescent light tubes which are hung from 72 robotic fixtures on the ceiling of the exhibition space, equally spaced. Each light tube measures 1.83 m long and is rotated using a computer-controlled stepper motor. All lights are always on and typically constitute the only lighting in the exhibition hall, except for the natural light that spills into the space. View Details.
Levels of Nothingness
Levels of Nothingness
Performers 1, 2009
An installation-performance commissioned for the 50th Anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum, inspired by Kandinsky's opera, "The Yellow Sound" (1912). In "Levels of Nothingness", the human voice is analyzed by computers, automatically controlling a full rig of Rock-and-Roll concert lighting and creating an interactive colour show. For the New York performances, Isabella Rossellini read a libretto co-written by Brian Massumi, which included seminal philosophical texts on skepticism, color and perception, including writings by Kandinsky, Deleuze, Sanches, Simon Baron-Cohen and Alexander Luria. Following the performances, audience members could test the color-generating microphone. View Details.
Method Random
Method Random
2014
“Method Random” is a series of chromogenic prints that have been generated by computational methods that attempt to create randomness. Random number generators (RNG) are essential algorithms for a large number of applications from encryption and security to simulation, jury selection, double-blind trials, statistical sampling, game theory and many others. While the sum of all colours picked by different RNG algorithms generates a neutral gray, patterns can be discerned when massive number of pixels can be seen simultaneously. These prints show how human perception of organization can often spot the fundamental difficulty for computers to appear unpredictable. View Details.
Nave Solar
Nave Solar
2011
Nave Solar is an interactive installation featuring a fake Sun that is activated by the pendular motion of the public as they hang from a rope and swing along the nave of a 16th Century catholic inquisition church. Using tracking systems, the installation detects the motion of participants and generates smoke that accumulates on the ceiling of the apse as well as activates the Sun's flares, surface turbulence and sun spots. View Details.
Navier-Stokes
Navier-Stokes
2009
"Navier-Stokes" is a series of computer-controlled lightboxes that show satellite pictures of border regions that have a vector of economic disparity, a history of military conflict or heavy migratory traffic. Instead of using regular white fluorescent light tubes to illuminate the print, the pieces have over one hundred thousand light emitting diodes (LEDs), which can highlight tiny features within the image. The first piece shows the Tijuana-San Diego border with Mexico illuminated red by default while the US is dark. View Details.
Nineteen Eighty-Four
Nineteen Eighty-Four
2014
"Nineteen Eighty-Four" is an interactive display that shows house address numbers extracted from Google Street View images. The display writes over 22 billion different combinations of the number 1984, which change at a user-specified speed. Typing any number onto an onboard keyboard starts a count-down or count-up until eventually the number 1984 is reached. View Details.
Pan-Anthem
Pan-Anthem
Subsculpture 16, 2014
"Pan-Anthem" is an interactive sound installation where the national anthem of every country in the World plays back on a movable speaker that is magnetically attached to a large wall. The speakers are precisely arranged to visualize national statistics: population, GDP, area, number of women in parliament, GINI, year of independence, HDI and so on. For example, when the work is configured to show military spending per capita, on the far left of the wall the public can hear the anthems of countries without military forces like Costa Rica, Iceland and Andorra while at the far right they can hear Saudi Arabia, Israel and the United States, which spend more than $2,000 per person per year. If no one is in the exhibition room all the speakers are silent, but as a visitor approaches a particular set of speakers these start playing automatically, creating a positional panoramic playback of anthems associated to similar statistics View Details.
Seismoscopes
Seismoscopes
2009
The series "Seismoscopes" consists of devices that detect vibration around them, from footsteps to earthquakes, and record this vibration on paper using an automated XY-plotter. As each Seismoscope registers any seismic wave it is programmed to draw an illustration of a single Skeptical philosopher, over and over again. View Details.
Sitestepper
Sitestepper
Relational Architecture 10, 2004
"Sitestepper" is an Internet program that shows a 3D view of an apparently "neutral" living room. This space can be transformed automatically by scanning a website to extract its images, texts, colours and sounds. The system analyzes the contents of the submitted webpage and uses them to furnish and decorate the room, "branding" the space with a layer of live media. This project was commissioned for LA MOCA's digital gallery. View Details.
Solar Equation
Solar Equation
Relational Architecture 16, 2010
"Solar Equation" is a large-scale public art installation that consists of a faithful simulation of the Sun, 100 million times smaller than the real thing. Commissioned by the Light in Winter Festival in Melbourne, the piece features the world’s largest spherical balloon, custom-manufactured for the project, which is tethered over Federation Square and animated using five projectors. The solar animation on the balloon is generated by live mathematical equations that simulate the turbulence, flares and sunspots that can be seen on the surface of the Sun. This produces a constantly changing display that never repeats itself, giving viewers a glimpse of the majestic phenomena that are observable at the solar surface and that only relatively recent advances in astronomy have discovered. Using an iPhone, iPod touch or iPad, people may disturb the animations in real-time and select different fluid dynamic visualizations. View Details.
Sphere Packing
Sphere Packing
Subsculpture 15, 2013
"Sphere Packing" is a series of 3D-printed pieces designed to concentrate the entire musical production of a composer in a single dense multi-channel device. The size of each sphere is directly proportional to how prolific the composer was, for example the sphere for Johann Sebastian Bach has 48 cm diameter and holds 1100 loudspeakers playing simultaneously Bach's 1100 different compositions, while the sphere for Hildegaard Von Bingen only has 11 cm diameter and 69 loudspeakers. The project presents at a glance the comparative production volume of many composers. As people are a couple metres away from a sphere they hear a quiet murmur of sounds, but as they approach and put their ear up close to individual speakers they can hone in on specific compositions. View Details.
Standards and Double Standards
Standards and Double Standards
Subsculpture 3, 2004
"Standards and Double Standards" is an interactive installation that consists of 10 to 100 fastened belts that are suspended at waist height from stepper motors on the ceiling of the exhibition room. Controlled by a computerized tracking system, the belts rotate automatically to follow the public, turning their buckles slowly to face passers-by. When several people are in the room their presence affects the entire group of belts, creating chaotic patterns of interference. Non-linear behaviours emerge such as turbulence, eddies and relatively quiet regions. View Details.
Sway
Sway
2016
“Sway” is a kinetic sculpture that responds to data; it is a computer-controlled metronome that oscillates to the rhythm of a specific statistic. The rope was braided onto a thin vertical steel rod to make it stand upright and the floor rope acts as a free-standing base. The piece stands on a wooden plinth which contains a small motor and an electrical circuit that makes the noose sway and pendulate almost imperceptibly from time to time. The sway adds to the trompe l’oeil effect of the rope hanging upside-down. The collector or curator may choose the frequency with which the rope sways, with the default value being around once every 40 to 60 seconds, which represents the rate of homicides in the World. View Details.
Synaptic Caguamas
Synaptic Caguamas
Subsculpture 4, 2004
"Synaptic Caguamas" is a kinetic sculpture consisting of a motorized Mexican "cantina" bar table with 30 "Caguama"-sized beer bottles (1-litre each). The bottles spin on the table with patterns generated by cellular automata algorithms that simulate the neuronal connections in the brain. Every few minutes the bottles are reset automatically and seeded with new initial conditions for the algorithm, so that the movement patterns are never repeated. View Details.
The Year's Midnight
The Year's Midnight
2011
"The Year's Midnight" is an interactive installation that shows the viewers' image on screen, unprocessed, except for plumes of white or black smoke that emanate from their eye sockets until the whole display is filled with a dense smog. Live and recorded eyeballs extracted from the video accumulate on the bottom of the display, similar to traditional representations of St. Lucy. The project's name is the beginning of John Donne's "A Nocturnal Upon St. Lucy's Day, Being the Shortest Day", a mournful poem which inspires this work. View Details.
Wavefunction
Wavefunction
Subsculpture 9, 2007
"Wavefunction" is a kinetic sculpture comprised of fifty to one hundred Charles and Ray Eames moulded chairs (designed in 1948) and placed in a regular array of rows, facing the entrance to the exhibition space. When someone approaches the work, a computerised surveillance system detects their presence and the closest chairs automatically begin to lift off the ground, creating the crest of a wave that then spreads over the whole room. View Details.
X is not the new Y
X is not the new Y
2011
A small format artwork where over 500,000 combinations of proper names, companies and cities are presented as random inequalities by two electronic paper displays. View Details.