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Articulated Intersect
Articulated Intersect
Relational Architecture 18
Montréal (2011), Hobart (2014)
“Articulated Intersect” is a large-scale installation that produces an interactive canopy of light that can be modified by the public using six large lever-controllers that protrude from the ground. As a participant points one of these levers three powerful robotic searchlights automatically intersect in the sky to create an apex at that location. The participant may direct the apex anywhere over the city in real-time, creating an animated tetrahedron inspired by the work of Richard Buckminster Fuller. View Details.
Body Movies
Body Movies
Relational Architecture 6
Rotterdam (2001), Linz (2002), Lisbon (2002), Liverpool (2002), Duisburg (2003), Hong Kong (2006), Wellington (2008), Québec City (2008)
"Body Movies" transforms public space with interactive projections measuring between 400 and 1,800 square metres. Thousands of photographic portraits, previously taken on the streets of the host city, are shown using robotically controlled projectors. However the portraits only appear inside the projected shadows of the passers-by, whose silhouettes can measure between two and twenty-five metres depending on how close or far away they are from the powerful light sources positioned on the ground. View Details.
Frequency and Volume
Frequency and Volume
Relational Architecture 9
Mexico City (2003), Taichung (2004), Montréal (2005), Tokyo (2005), Venice (2007), London (2008), Tokyo (2009), Copenhagen (2009), Singapore (2011), Paris (2011), Barcelona (2011), San Francisco (2012)
"Frequency and Volume" enables participants to tune into and listen to different radio frequencies by using their own bodies. A computerised tracking system detects participants' shadows, which are projected on a wall of the exhibition space. The shadows scan the radio waves with their presence and position, while their size controls the volume of the signal. The piece can tune into any frequency between 150 kHz and 1.5 GHz, including air traffic control, FM, AM, short wave, cellular, CB, satellite, wireless telecommunication systems and radio navigation. Up to sixteen frequencies can be tuned simultaneously and the resulting sound environment forms a composition controlled by people's movements. View Details.
Levels of Nothingness
Levels of Nothingness
Performers 1
New York City (2009)
An installation-performance commissioned for the 50th Anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum, inspired by Kandinsky's opera, "The Yellow Sound" (1912). In "Levels of Nothingness", the human voice is analyzed by computers, automatically controlling a full rig of Rock-and-Roll concert lighting and creating an interactive colour show. For the New York performances, Isabella Rossellini read a libretto co-written by Brian Massumi, which included seminal philosophical texts on skepticism, color and perception, including writings by Kandinsky, Deleuze, Sanches, Simon Baron-Cohen and Alexander Luria. Following the performances, audience members could test the color-generating microphone. View Details.
Pulse Front
Pulse Front
Relational Architecture 12
Toronto (2007)
"Pulse Front" was a matrix of light over Toronto's Harbourfront, made with lightbeams from twenty powerful robotic searchlights, entirely controlled by a network of sensors that measured the heart rate of passers-by. Ten metal sculptures detected the pulse of people who held them: the readings were immediately converted into light pulses by the computers and also determined the orientation of the beams. View Details.
Pulse Park
Pulse Park
Relational Architecture 14
New York City (2008), Bochum (2012)
"Pulse Park" is comprised of a matrix of light beams that graze the central oval field of Madison Square Park. Their intensity is entirely modulated by a sensor that measures the heart rate of participants and the resulting effect is the visualization of vital signs, arguably our most symbolic biometric, in an urban scale. View Details.
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Biometric Abstraction
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Biometric Abstraction

Istanbul (2013), Madrid (2014)
The focus of this exhibition is Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's interest in biometrics, the statistical analysis of biological data. The works detect, sample and process signs of life: embodying, materializing and accumulating traces of human presence. All of the installations are conceptually rooted in emotionally evocative biometrics includingthat include the beating heart, the breath, physiognomy, kinesiology and the keystone of human communication, the voice. With these interactive works the artist proposes to alter Frank Stella’s minimalist statement “What you see is what you get,” into "What you give is what you get". View Details.
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse Show
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse Show

Irvine (2010)
A solo exhibition featuring all the projects that Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has made with a biometric interface. The entire content of the exhibition is generated by the vital signs of the public, which are visualized using blinking light bulbs, recorded finger prints, waves in a ripple tank and other materializations. View Details.
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Recorders
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Recorders

Oldenburg (2008), Manchester (2010), Sydney (2011)
A large-scale solo exhibition, presenting eight to thirteen interactive pieces that underline the performative character of the public as an integral part of the artwork. In “Recorders” artworks hear, see or feel the public; they exhibit awareness and record and replay memories entirely obtained during the show. The pieces either depend on participation to exist or predatorily gather information on the public through surveillance and biometric technologies. The exhibition is meant to oscillate between the seduction of participation, preservation and inclusion, and the violence of Orwellian and ubiquitous computerized detection. In all cases the artwork compiles a database of behaviours that then becomes the artwork itself. View Details.
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Trackers
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Trackers

Paris (2011), Buenos Aires (2012)
The exhibition is conceived as an environment mixing detection technologies and audiovisual explorations in real time. By using "live cameras" and tracking systems, we attempt to materialize computerized surveillance, transforming the technological observation into a tangible form. View Details.
Sandbox
Sandbox
Relational Architecture 17
Santa Monica (2010)
Sandbox is a large-scale interactive installation created originally for Glow Santa Monica. The piece consists of two small sandboxes where one can see tiny projections of people who are at the beach. As participants reach out to touch these small ghosts, a camera detects their hands and relays them live to two of the world's brightest projectors, which hang from a boom lift and which project the hands over 8,000 square feet of beach. In this way people share three scales: the tiny sandbox images, the real human scale and the monstrous scale of special effects. View Details.
Solar Equation
Solar Equation
Relational Architecture 16
Melbourne (2010), Durham (2013)
"Solar Equation" is a large-scale public art installation that consists of a faithful simulation of the Sun, 100 million times smaller than the real thing. Commissioned by the Light in Winter Festival in Melbourne, the piece features the world’s largest spherical balloon, custom-manufactured for the project, which is tethered over Federation Square and animated using five projectors. The solar animation on the balloon is generated by live mathematical equations that simulate the turbulence, flares and sunspots that can be seen on the surface of the Sun. This produces a constantly changing display that never repeats itself, giving viewers a glimpse of the majestic phenomena that are observable at the solar surface and that only relatively recent advances in astronomy have discovered. Using an iPhone, iPod touch or iPad, people may disturb the animations in real-time and select different fluid dynamic visualizations. View Details.
Under Scan
Under Scan
Relational Architecture 11
Lincoln (2005), Leicester (2006), Derby (2006), Nottingham (2006), Venice (2007), London (2008)
"Under Scan" is a public art installation based on self-representation. Thousands of "video-portraits" taken in Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton and Nottingham are projected onto the ground; at first, the portraits are not visible because the space is flooded by white light coming from a high-powered projector. As people walk around the area, their shadows are cast on the ground, revealing the video-portraits in short sequences. View Details.
Vectorial Elevation
Vectorial Elevation
Relational Architecture 4
Mexico City (1999), Vitoria-Gasteiz (2002), Lyon (2003), Dublin (2004), Vancouver (2010)
"Vectorial Elevation" is an interactive art project originally designed to celebrate the arrival of the year 2000 in Mexico City's Zócalo Square. The website www.alzado.net enabled any Internet user to design light sculptures over the city's historic centre, with eighteen searchlights positioned around the square. These searchlights, whose powerful beams could be seen within a 15 kilometers radius, were controlled by an online 3D simulation program and visualised by digital cameras. A personalised webpage was produced for every participant with images of their design and information such as their name, dedication, place of access and comments. View Details.
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Biometric Abstraction
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Biometric Abstraction

Istanbul (2013), Madrid (2014)
The focus of this exhibition is Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's interest in biometrics, the statistical analysis of biological data. The works detect, sample and process signs of life: embodying, materializing and accumulating traces of human presence. All of the installations are conceptually rooted in emotionally evocative biometrics includingthat include the beating heart, the breath, physiognomy, kinesiology and the keystone of human communication, the voice. With these interactive works the artist proposes to alter Frank Stella’s minimalist statement “What you see is what you get,” into "What you give is what you get". View Details.
Articulated Intersect
Articulated Intersect
Relational Architecture 18
Montréal (2011), Hobart (2014)
“Articulated Intersect” is a large-scale installation that produces an interactive canopy of light that can be modified by the public using six large lever-controllers that protrude from the ground. As a participant points one of these levers three powerful robotic searchlights automatically intersect in the sky to create an apex at that location. The participant may direct the apex anywhere over the city in real-time, creating an animated tetrahedron inspired by the work of Richard Buckminster Fuller. View Details.
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Trackers
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Trackers

Paris (2011), Buenos Aires (2012)
The exhibition is conceived as an environment mixing detection technologies and audiovisual explorations in real time. By using "live cameras" and tracking systems, we attempt to materialize computerized surveillance, transforming the technological observation into a tangible form. View Details.
Sandbox
Sandbox
Relational Architecture 17
Santa Monica (2010)
Sandbox is a large-scale interactive installation created originally for Glow Santa Monica. The piece consists of two small sandboxes where one can see tiny projections of people who are at the beach. As participants reach out to touch these small ghosts, a camera detects their hands and relays them live to two of the world's brightest projectors, which hang from a boom lift and which project the hands over 8,000 square feet of beach. In this way people share three scales: the tiny sandbox images, the real human scale and the monstrous scale of special effects. View Details.
Solar Equation
Solar Equation
Relational Architecture 16
Melbourne (2010), Durham (2013)
"Solar Equation" is a large-scale public art installation that consists of a faithful simulation of the Sun, 100 million times smaller than the real thing. Commissioned by the Light in Winter Festival in Melbourne, the piece features the world’s largest spherical balloon, custom-manufactured for the project, which is tethered over Federation Square and animated using five projectors. The solar animation on the balloon is generated by live mathematical equations that simulate the turbulence, flares and sunspots that can be seen on the surface of the Sun. This produces a constantly changing display that never repeats itself, giving viewers a glimpse of the majestic phenomena that are observable at the solar surface and that only relatively recent advances in astronomy have discovered. Using an iPhone, iPod touch or iPad, people may disturb the animations in real-time and select different fluid dynamic visualizations. View Details.
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse Show
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Pulse Show

Irvine (2010)
A solo exhibition featuring all the projects that Rafael Lozano-Hemmer has made with a biometric interface. The entire content of the exhibition is generated by the vital signs of the public, which are visualized using blinking light bulbs, recorded finger prints, waves in a ripple tank and other materializations. View Details.
Levels of Nothingness
Levels of Nothingness
Performers 1
New York City (2009)
An installation-performance commissioned for the 50th Anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum, inspired by Kandinsky's opera, "The Yellow Sound" (1912). In "Levels of Nothingness", the human voice is analyzed by computers, automatically controlling a full rig of Rock-and-Roll concert lighting and creating an interactive colour show. For the New York performances, Isabella Rossellini read a libretto co-written by Brian Massumi, which included seminal philosophical texts on skepticism, color and perception, including writings by Kandinsky, Deleuze, Sanches, Simon Baron-Cohen and Alexander Luria. Following the performances, audience members could test the color-generating microphone. View Details.
Pulse Park
Pulse Park
Relational Architecture 14
New York City (2008), Bochum (2012)
"Pulse Park" is comprised of a matrix of light beams that graze the central oval field of Madison Square Park. Their intensity is entirely modulated by a sensor that measures the heart rate of participants and the resulting effect is the visualization of vital signs, arguably our most symbolic biometric, in an urban scale. View Details.
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Recorders
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: Recorders

Oldenburg (2008), Manchester (2010), Sydney (2011)
A large-scale solo exhibition, presenting eight to thirteen interactive pieces that underline the performative character of the public as an integral part of the artwork. In “Recorders” artworks hear, see or feel the public; they exhibit awareness and record and replay memories entirely obtained during the show. The pieces either depend on participation to exist or predatorily gather information on the public through surveillance and biometric technologies. The exhibition is meant to oscillate between the seduction of participation, preservation and inclusion, and the violence of Orwellian and ubiquitous computerized detection. In all cases the artwork compiles a database of behaviours that then becomes the artwork itself. View Details.
Pulse Front
Pulse Front
Relational Architecture 12
Toronto (2007)
"Pulse Front" was a matrix of light over Toronto's Harbourfront, made with lightbeams from twenty powerful robotic searchlights, entirely controlled by a network of sensors that measured the heart rate of passers-by. Ten metal sculptures detected the pulse of people who held them: the readings were immediately converted into light pulses by the computers and also determined the orientation of the beams. View Details.
Under Scan
Under Scan
Relational Architecture 11
Lincoln (2005), Leicester (2006), Derby (2006), Nottingham (2006), Venice (2007), London (2008)
"Under Scan" is a public art installation based on self-representation. Thousands of "video-portraits" taken in Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton and Nottingham are projected onto the ground; at first, the portraits are not visible because the space is flooded by white light coming from a high-powered projector. As people walk around the area, their shadows are cast on the ground, revealing the video-portraits in short sequences. View Details.
Frequency and Volume
Frequency and Volume
Relational Architecture 9
Mexico City (2003), Taichung (2004), Montréal (2005), Tokyo (2005), Venice (2007), London (2008), Tokyo (2009), Copenhagen (2009), Singapore (2011), Paris (2011), Barcelona (2011), San Francisco (2012)
"Frequency and Volume" enables participants to tune into and listen to different radio frequencies by using their own bodies. A computerised tracking system detects participants' shadows, which are projected on a wall of the exhibition space. The shadows scan the radio waves with their presence and position, while their size controls the volume of the signal. The piece can tune into any frequency between 150 kHz and 1.5 GHz, including air traffic control, FM, AM, short wave, cellular, CB, satellite, wireless telecommunication systems and radio navigation. Up to sixteen frequencies can be tuned simultaneously and the resulting sound environment forms a composition controlled by people's movements. View Details.
Body Movies
Body Movies
Relational Architecture 6
Rotterdam (2001), Linz (2002), Lisbon (2002), Liverpool (2002), Duisburg (2003), Hong Kong (2006), Wellington (2008), Québec City (2008)
"Body Movies" transforms public space with interactive projections measuring between 400 and 1,800 square metres. Thousands of photographic portraits, previously taken on the streets of the host city, are shown using robotically controlled projectors. However the portraits only appear inside the projected shadows of the passers-by, whose silhouettes can measure between two and twenty-five metres depending on how close or far away they are from the powerful light sources positioned on the ground. View Details.
Vectorial Elevation
Vectorial Elevation
Relational Architecture 4
Mexico City (1999), Vitoria-Gasteiz (2002), Lyon (2003), Dublin (2004), Vancouver (2010)
"Vectorial Elevation" is an interactive art project originally designed to celebrate the arrival of the year 2000 in Mexico City's Zócalo Square. The website www.alzado.net enabled any Internet user to design light sculptures over the city's historic centre, with eighteen searchlights positioned around the square. These searchlights, whose powerful beams could be seen within a 15 kilometers radius, were controlled by an online 3D simulation program and visualised by digital cameras. A personalised webpage was produced for every participant with images of their design and information such as their name, dedication, place of access and comments. View Details.