Navier-Stokes

"Navier-Stokes" is a series of computer-controlled lightboxes that show satellite pictures of border regions that have a vector of economic disparity, a history of military conflict or heavy migratory traffic. Instead of using regular white fluorescent light tubes to illuminate the print, the pieces have over one hundred thousand light emitting diodes (LEDs), which can be independently controlled and highlight tiny features within the image. The first piece shows the Tijuana-San Diego border with Mexico illuminated red by default while the US is dark. Periodically, a random opening of the border lets a plume of red colour take-over the United States. Once both countries are red, the process starts over. The piece can be connected to the internet, in which case it automatically searches news sites for the words "Tijuana San Diego" and any matches will then be proportional to the number of plumes of smoke in the map.
Name in spanish: Navier-Stokes
Year of Creation: 2009
Technique: Duratrans print, 110,000 light emitting diodes, circuitry, computer, internet connection
Dimensions: 200 x 150 x 30 centimeters
Keywords: generator, indoor, lights, networked, print, smoke.
Photo library (click to expand)
2012 - Zones of Contention, Weatherspoon Art Museum Greensboro, Greensboro, United States
2010 - Antimodular Research
2009 - Haunch of Venison Gallery, New York City, United States

Exhibitions

Credits

  • Concept and direction - Rafael Lozano-Hemmer
  • Programming and hardware - Gideon May
  • Image - Karine Charbonneau
  • Frame - Pierre Fournier

Bibliography